Decorative Stones For Landscape Designs

These days, many home owners like to use decorative stones in their landscape projects. Decorative stones like Walnut nuggets, Western Sunrise, Arctic rainbow, Spanish tile, Walnut pebbles, Silica pebbles and Royal Gorge offer a classic look to your landscape.

There are some landscape supply companies that provide variety of decorative stones for exterior embellishment. These stones do not require more maintenance. You simply need to rinse them with a garden hose, whenever they become dull.

Decorative stones like Beachwood pebbles are man-made silica stones and are brown in color. They are lightweight and very simple to install. They offer an exquisite backdrop to your landscape design. You can order these beautiful stones at any credible landscape supply company.

Royal Gorge is yet another type of beautiful stone that add beauty to your landscape design project. You can get this decorative stone from landscape supply companies. You can easily install them and can enhance the elegance of your garden. You can use these decorative stones in between paving creatively and can create a unique landscape design.

Walnut nuggets are popular type of decorative stones that come from the Merrimac River near St. Louis. These beautiful stones offer an economic solution to your landscape design problems. Unlike grass or paving, they do not require more maintenance work. You can use them in patios, domestic driveways and anywhere in the garden.

You can install the decorative stones directly onto the soil in your garden. However, it is advisable to use a membrane, which can help to minimize the growth of weeds. This in turn can make your landscape project perfect and maintenance-free.

Flagstones and wall stones are significant for your landscape look. You can get variety of flagstones like Ohio blue flagstone, Canadian Buff flagstone and Slate flagstone from a landscape supply company. Using flagstone in your landscape design project can offer a striking appearance to your landscape. In addition, flagstones help to retain a cool surface in your garden, even if it receives direct sunlight.

Wall stones are equally important for your landscape project. You can use wall stone varieties like Armour stone, Canadian limestone and Canadian Wall stone for any of landscape design project that requires stacked stones. You can use them for retaining walls, borders around gardens and pools or for free standing walls.

Rosetta Stone Products are a high quality wall stone perfect for steps and landscapes. You should look for a preferred vendor of Rosetta Stone Walls, Steps or Accent products. They have the design and installation expertise to transform your landscape into a beautiful space that you will love and enjoy for years to come.

Decorating a Home or Office With Landscape Art Prints

Decorating with a beautiful, natural landscapes can help create a relaxing atmosphere in your home or office. Choosing the landscape artwork for the room you are decorating allows you to express your own personal style. You can choose from among many different artists, artistic styles, colors and frames to create unlimited options.


The first thing you will want to consider is coordinating the colors of the framed picture with the other furniture and accent pieces already in place. Next, think about your interests and choose an artwork based on your hobbies or other things that you like. For example, identify your favorite season or color. You many also want to consider your dream vacation, whether it’s a tropical beach paradise, a majestic mountain getaway or a cottage with rolling hills and trees as the scenery. By choosing a landscape art print you love, you can create a sanctuary where you will love to spend your time.

Seasonal Art Prints

Enjoy your favorite season all year with home decor items. Spring art prints complement rooms decorated in pastel colors. Choose a summer-themed print if you want to decorate with bold, warm colors. Orange, red and yellow hues will coordinate well with fall landscape decor. The beautiful cool colors of winter from a framed piece of art can put the finishing touch on your winter wonderland.


If you want to be whisked away to your favorite vacation destination, choose a landscape artwork that can help your imagination can run wild. Travel to Tahiti with Paul Gauguin’s art prints or discover the beautiful scenery of the Western United States with Albert Bierstadt art. Kick back and enjoy the tropical beach scenery, beautiful views of Italy or lush forests from Diane Romanello’s paintings. If the hustle and bustle of the big city is more your style, Henri Silberman’s black and white photography is perfect for a room with modern decor.

Artistic Style

One final consideration is your artistic style preference. If you appreciate photography, artists such as Ansel Adams and Jeff Maihara, should be considered. Impressionist landscape art prints from Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Claude Monet are beautiful and will add a touch of elegance to your interior. Other artists to check out when decorating with landscape art prints include: Steve Thoms, Camille Pissarro, Winslow Homer and Katsushika Hokusai.

Selecting the right landscape artwork can be an exciting adventure as you explore all the different sceneries from around the globe.

A Look Back In Time: Landscaping Trends From the 1920s-50s

Although some of us look at landscaping as more of a business than an art form, the truth is, landscaping has a rich and intricate history that has a lot to say about the social and cultural development of our society. In fact, some speak so highly of landscaping as a form of ancient art that they trace its roots to one of the Seven Wonders of the World – the Hanging Gardens of Babylon created in 600 BC.

While we’re busy installing landscapes that bring the best of modern technologies to our customers, like outdoor televisions and sound systems, it’s easy to forget just how much the idea of ‘landscaping’ has changed over time. Just a few decades back, landscaping was considered an absolute luxury. Only the ‘well-to-do’ could afford to decorate their outdoor space with beautiful garden beds and patios and deck out their backyard with the latest outdoor toys.

Nowadays, some form of landscaping – even if it means a few trees, a small yard, a porch or patio – is expected. That being said, while basic landscaping is the norm, most homeowners actually take it a step further. They feel it is important to enhance the curb appeal to their home and, more importantly, they enjoy having an outdoor space that is completely tailored to their own tastes. Hence, the desire to treat the landscape as an extension of the home, complete with all the comforts and added luxuries of the inside interior. But it wasn’t always this way.

For fun, here’s a look back at the landscaping trends of earlier decades – minus today’s Japanese-inspired spa gardens, outdoor kitchens, and fire pit tables.

The Roarin’ 20’s:

1920’s landscaping was all about the greenery. There was a real desire to celebrate and welcome nature in all its glory, which led homeowners to install bird feeders, bird houses and bird baths, as well as fish ponds and rock gardens… anything that would draw more nature to the home. At this time, bird watching was a shared hobby, so plants and trees with berries (such as holly, hawthorne, nandina, rugosa roses, crabapples) were popular choices.

In the 1920’s home, the front yard was considered the “public place” and was, therefore, the space that received the most attention with regards to landscaping. Most houses featured a wide front porch, often furnished with rockers and swings so that folks could comfortably enjoy the natural outdoor scenery. Most front yards didn’t have fences, and walkways and driveways were typically lined with perennials, such as Canterbury bells, irises, foxgloves, phlox, pyrethrum, coreopsis, hollyhocks, roses, columbine, delphinium, poppies, and carnations and annuals, such as California poppies, cosmos, petunias, snapdragons, verbena, bachelor’s buttons, centaurea (sweet sultan), strawflowers, marigolds, drummond phlox, asters, etc. Shrubs were boxwood, holly, yews, abelia.

The backyard, often referred to as the “service area” was mostly reserved for drying clothes on clothes lines and storing garbage cans, although some owners designated a small area in the backyard as a “private place,” which was usually screened off or fenced in or surrounded by a border of trees or shrubs to shield residents from their neighbors’ watchful eyes and from the sun.

Popular recreational activities often found their way into the landscape design. Campfires, bowling greens, putting greens, and croquet grounds were popular landscape features.

The Dirty 30’s:

The decade of the Great Depression saw little advancements on the landscaping front. Most homeowners were struggling to make ends meet, which meant little to no money was left over to spend on luxuries, such as landscaping. That being said, there were still a few popular gardening trends. Large rose gardens were popular during the 1930s, as were plants such as hydrangeas, lilacs and hostas.

The Booming 50’s:

Consumerism is probably the most appropriate word to describe the theme of the 1950s. And just as it affected most aspects of life in the 50s, it influenced the type and style of landscaping that was popular in suburbia. Looking back now, we typically associate the 50s garden and landscape style with all things ‘tacky’ – garden gnomes, plastic pink flamingos, an overuse of evergreens as foundation plantings and an excessive amount of green lawn. In other words, a far cry from the modern, eco-friendly looks popular today!

While 1950s landscapes may conjure up images of plastic decorations and boxed hedges, the 1950s are actually defined as a decade of “modernism.” Albeit, a type of modernism far different from the so-called “modern” styles of today. With an incredible amount of soldiers returning home from the war in the 1950s, getting married and starting families, the home building industry boomed.

However, much of the homes built were on the smaller side, leaving limited space for landscaping. The result of space constrictions was “modern” landscaping – a style that was far removed from the overly-embellished look of the pre-war era.

Although modernism was the style du-jour, with the rise of consumerism and the love for all things with a price tag came the fascination with big and showy items. Garden flowers were over-sized, vibrant and colorful, for instance, large tea roses like Garden Party roses, Tiffany roses, and Chrysler Imperial roses were popular choices. And, in line with the whole ‘keeping up with the Jones’ concept, the lawn was the symbol of suburbia dream living. The greener and bigger the lawn, the better! With the boom in consumerism and the desire to keep lawns perfectly maintained, the marketplace was flooded with lawn care products, including pesticides and chemicals for pest control. At this time, the first lawn spreader was also invented.

And there you have it! Times really have changed… next we’ll look at landscaping trends from the 60s to present date. Stay tuned!